Lessons from going one year makeup free!

For those of you who’ve been following me for a while you might remember a little blog post I did towards the last week of July last year about giving up makeup. Check it out here if you haven’t read it yet.

Anywho, it has officially been 1 whole year without makeup for me and I wanted to talk about a few things I learned along the way.

But first let’s talk about the reasons I gave it up in the first place.

  1. First and foremost I’m pretty lazy when it comes to my morning routine. I get up brush my teeth run a brush through my hair and that’s the gist of it. Maybe I’ll do a ponytail or braid if I’m feeling particularly adventurous. But having makeup in the routine was taking up too much time in my opinion, and quite honestly I was only using it to cover up blemishes anyway, not to turn myself into the next Victoria’s Secret model lol
  2. That stuff is expensive, and there’s so many brands to choose from. I’d walk into the store and it was time-consuming enough to find something that matched my skin tone, let alone wondering what the heck the different between a bb cream and a cc cream was.
  3. Most of the time I only managed to put on eyeliner and a bit of concealer and that was it.
  4. And quite frankly I was irritated that men could go out with a fresh face every stinking day without anyone making a peep but if I went out without eyeliner everyone asked me if I was “tired” and “doing okay”. As though my fresh face looked like one of an ill person. Oy.

So I decided to do a little experiment. I got rid of it all. Every last bit. GONE.

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Quite honestly, I’m glad I did it.

Now I’ll tell you, for someone with acne scars and nice discolored bits on my face it was definitely an adjustment to go out without any “war paint” as it were. But you know what? Eventually I got used to it, and so did everyone else. I no longer bet any comments about my appearance except for those who say “oh, you look great today, where’d you get that skirt?” etc.

I’ve learned quite a bit from this experiment…

  1. Most people aren’t scrutinizing your face to see if you’re wearing makeup every single day. As a matter of fact, most people simply don’t care. So don’t base your choices on what others might think of your fresh makeup-free face.
  2. Makeup can be used for two purposes, the first being to hide imperfections, the second to enhance your favorite features. I prefer the second reason to the first. Everyone has some sort of imperfection and most are quite interesting and beautiful, like freckles. Now acne scars aren’t what I’d personally consider beautiful, but I can deal with others seeing them. If anyone asks, I simply explain I have food intolerances that caused a lot of acne growing up and these are the battle scars, so to speak.
  3. Don’t be embarrassed by your face. Everyone breaks out occasionally, just like a lot of people get weird sunglasses tanlines in the summer, its inevitable. Its HUMAN. It’s nothing to be ashamed of.
  4. If you are insecure about breakouts or blemishes, try not looking into the mirror for a week. Soon enough you’ll realize it isn’t that big of a deal and there are much more interesting ways to spend your time.
  5. Guys go out without makeup, and it’s perfectly acceptable for us women to as well. End of story. (I’d also add here that we can go out with hairy legs and braless as well, but I’ll save those bits for another post:) )
  6. Nixing makeup saves both time and money. And energy. If I don’t put anything on in the morning, I don’t have to spend copious amounts of time scraping it off at night.
  7. My last point is that society can be pretty demanding, always trying to sell you the next beauty treatment or wrinkle remover, but quite honestly we don’t need them. If you’re young you’ll probably have some breakouts, if your older you’ll be betting wrinkles and smile lines, but its all a normal part of growing up and growing older. So embrace your age as well as your face, they are stunningly unique after all (unless you’re an identical twin, but I digress) and they’re all yours.

I’ll admit I had a few times the past year when I was tempted to get some concealer to cover up a few things, but now that the year’s over I can now say that I don’t really miss the makeup…except on Halloween. Then, yeah I’ll probably make a bit of DIY makeup just for the hell of it. But the rest of the year I will enjoy going makeup free and embracing me, scars and all.

Have any of you tried going makeup free? Do you enjoy it or did you regret it? Have any zero-waste/minimalist makeup recipes for me? I’d love to hear about it all in the comments!

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Dealing with pre-minimalist/zero-waste purchases

Hey guys,

I wanted to do a quick post on something that I see questions about a lot…..what to do with those pre-minimalist/zero-waste purchases.

 

I’ll deal with them separately, let’s start with pre-minimalist purchases first:

When holding an item that you purchased weeks, months, even decades ago…it can be hard to let go. Whether it be a piece of clothing from high-school or a set of your great-grandmother’s doilies that sit around collecting dust, there are a few questions to ask yourself.

  1. Is this item being used?
  2. Is this item something that fits my body/current lifestyle?
  3. Do I LOVE said item?
  4. Do I really need it?

If you answered NO to any, or all of the above, then it’s probably time to let the item go. But don’t just throw it away…unless it is actually trash….if you can give it to a relative/friend who actually Wants it…donate it..sell it…recycle it…you get the idea.

Now I know what you’re going to say, “But Candice, I spent a lot of money on this/it has sentimental value/it was a gift…”

My answer, if you don’t love it and it doesn’t fit your lifestyle…then you shouldn’t hang onto it out of guilt.

Onto the pre-Zero-waste purchases

This one is a bit more difficult, because there are things that inevitably have been bought before becoming environmentally conscious that are still in good condition…but they’re plastic or made from something you don’t want near your body or your kids…or they’re hazardous to your health (hello most cleaning supplies, I’m talking about you).

For me, I did a few things.

First, I had a transitional period where I used up what was left of my personal care products like shampoo, toothpaste, etc. I did dispose of their containers responsibly when I was finished. But here’s the key- when I finished them off I found alternatives that were 1. Better for my health 2. Package free 3.or easy to make myself

As for the cleaning supplies, I gave them to family who wanted them. I wasn’t going to keep those carcinogens and neurotoxins near me any longer than absolutely necessary,  I switched straight over to vinegar and baking soda…no need for gloves or surgical masks when using them, they’re edible lol For laundry I switched to castille soap and soap nuts.

As I went through my possessions while I was minimizing, I automatically donated random things that were made of plastic that I was no longer using such as organizing buckets, etc. Since I was getting rid of so much stuff, I didn’t need them anymore.

I did have a few things that were still usable like plastic hangars and tupperware…the tupperware I got rid of immediately because I didn’t want plastic anywhere near my food, switched them all out for glass jars (you don’t necessarily have to go purchase new glass jars, you can always reuse ones from things like pasta sauces and jams, get creative) Same thing with plastic baggies, you don’t need them if you have glass jars. Let them go or donate to a local elementary classroom, they use them quite frequently.

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The hangars on the other hand stuck around for a while, but then they started breaking one by one and I found some wood and metal hangars lying around that were my grandparents that no one was using, and I ended up donating the plastic ones. Now, I did purchase one set of 6 new wood hangars to round out my set, but that was a personal decision. Not everyone can afford to buy new things just to replace their plastic counterparts.

So, to date…. I’ve mostly gotten rid of things as opposed to buying new. There were a few exceptions, such as glass jars, a set of hangars, cloth pads, a safety razor when I ran out of disposables, a new hairbrush when mine broke, and an adult laundry bucket (not made out of mesh!). But that’s about it.

The solution for pre-minimalist and pre-zero-waste purchases really depends on your personal situation, but most of the time they can be donated or recycled.

Keep in mind that minimalism and zero-waste are both journeys. They aren’t meant to be accomplished in one day or even a week, they can take years to switch over to. Look at me, I’ve been at it for a year and am just now starting to get really comfortable with my progress.

It’s all about the baby-steps!

If you have any questions, or any suggestions for future posts you would like to read…lett me know in the comments 🙂

Zero-Waste/Minimalist changes in the bathroom

Hey everyone, since starting this journey I have made quite a few baby steps in the right direction. Since it has officially been a little bit over since months since I started this blog, I thought I would give you all an update on my bathroom progress.

I live with other people, so instead of starting with changes in the kitchen, I originally started changing things in the bathroom first. The first ever change I made was switching from store bought toothpaste to making my own, and I haven’t looked back since.

Here is a comprehensive list of my minimalist/zero-waste bathroom changes:

  1. Toothpaste– instead of buying plastic tubes filled with chemical goo, I now use baking soda mixed with coconut oil and peppermint oil. Very easy and simple to do. Six months in and my teeth look and feel great. 🙂
  2. Deodorant– I switched from deodorant in a plastic tube, to crystal deodorant that comes sold loose in a cardboard box. It is not an antiperspirant (so you will still sweat occasionally) but it prevents the stink. The only time I notice any stinkiness is if I do an intense workout, then I shower right after anyways.
  3. Soap– no more plastic pumps or wraps for me, I swapped out the plastic wrapped version for loose bars that I buy at the health store. Easy swap, and they are cheaper too since I don’t pay for packaging.
  4. Shaving– I swapped out disposable razors for a safety razor, and the cans of shaving cream for shave soap from chagrin valley. I absolutely love this switch, the safety razor blade has lasted over two months now without needing to be replaced, and I get a much better shave.
  5. Waxing– Instead of waxing in the summer, I sugar. It is completely edible and much gentler on your skin. Check out my post here.
  6. Lotion– swapped for coconut oil and avocado oil when it is extra dry outside.
  7. Face scrubs, etc.- I can’t believe that a few years ago I flushed plastic beads down the drain with the face-wash I used to use. I’m ashamed that I ever bought the stuff. I now just use water or a gentle fragrance free bar of the loose soap for washing. I also use castor and argon oil and rose oil for any moisturizing that needs to be done.
  8. Nail file-swapped out the cheapo one with a metal one.
  9. Shampoo/Conditioner– I originally used shampoo bars, but it wasn’t working with my hair type. They cleaned very well, but I found that my already oily hair ended up feeling waxy. Now I am using the no-poo method, but I am still playing around with the measurements of baking soda and apple cider vinegar.
  10. Make-up -I stopped using it. See why here.
  11. Nail polishnixed it too.
  12. Brush/comb– swapped out the rundown plastic brush with a bamboo brush.
  13. Tooth brushes– swapped the plastic ones for bamboo.
  14. Hair– I always keep my hair long, it just is easier for me… that and I hate short hair. The problem was that when I emptied my hairbrush I used to just throw the pieces away into the trash. Now I stick them in the compost. I do the same thing when I trim the ends too, hair is biodegradable after all. Same thing goes for nail trimmings.
  15. Tools– all of my tools are now metal or bamboo. Ex: nail clippers, tweezers, brushes, etc.
  16. TissuesHankies are the cure!
  17. PMS– swapped out disposable pads for reusable cotton ones, and tampons are gone and I now use the DivaCup.
  18. Cleaning Supplies– I ditched the harsh chemicals and now clean with lemon, vinegar, and baking soda.

Quite the list! The only things I haven’t found switches for  yet are toilet paper, ear wax remover drops, and floss. I also need to buy a bamboo toilet brush.

Are there any other changes you have made to your bathroom?

Baby-Step #15- My face routine

Face care….at the store there is usually a whole half of an aisle dedicated to different products to wash, moisturize, tone, de-wrinkle, and scrub your poor skin. Why do we need so many? Half of which do not work anyway?

I am going to be completely honest with you, I struggled with severe acne for over 6 years. I tried every product and wash on the market, I even had prescription washes and medicines….none of them worked. Not One.

A few years ago I stumbled across a few articles about how acne can be related to food intolerances and allergies. Fast forward through a year of experimenting with my diet, and I found that I have severe problems with both grains and dairy. When I cut these out of my diet, voila` my skin improves and completely clears.

Once I got rid of the acne through a diet overhaul (more on that coming in another post), I found that there was no point in buying face-wash anymore because it just strips the natural oils off of your skin, and to combat that your skin makes more oils. It is also full of harsh chemicals that can irritate your skin. Besides that, all of the washes with the micro-beads are awful for the environment, the beads are made out of plastic that contaminates our water system. Who came up with the dumb idea that we should wash our faces with plastic? I want to know so I can go give them a piece of my mind.

So I now just gently rub a damp washcloth over my face twice a day. That is the extent of my “washing”. Simple, straight-forward, and doesn’t cost me anything except for the miniscule amount of water used.

As for the “moisturizer” component, I have a mixture of grapeseed oil and castor oil that I rub on my face each day. It sits in an old glass spice jar on my dresser. The oils have been great for my face, especially since I tend to get dry skin in the summertime. If I get really dry, I might add some argon oil on my face before bed, but that is it.

Before: skin-care-aisleAfter:

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